Nebraska

Reflecting Chimney

Reflecting Chimney

Located near Bayard, Nebraska, Chimney Rock was the most famous landmark to greet 19th-century, westward-bound pioneers on the Oregon, California and Mormon trails. From a 21 st-century viewpoint, the monument reveals a utilitarian side of nature with irrigation runoff creating a mirror image.
Monarch Summer

Monarch Summer

A wildflower draws a male monarch to the five-acre Maxwell Arboretum on the University of Nebraska-Lincoln's east campus. Elongated stems of goldenrod, Nebraska's state flower, intertwine with miniature purple flowers in the midst of lush shrubbery and trees that populate the campus grounds.
Fire Road

Fire Road

Elsewhere in the panhandle the burned-out shell of a car, juxtaposed with a speed-limit sign, signifies the utter isolation of the area. With the south side of Lake McConaughy barely visible in the distance, this image was captured on Lakeview Road north of Highway 26.
New Albany at Nebraska City

New Albany at Nebraska City

Standard lavender mount with the verso imprint of R. Goebel's Photographic Art Gallery, St. Charles, Mo. The name Nebraska City No. 2 can be seen clearly on the paddle housing, and she carries stacks of firewood, one cart, and about a dozen passengers. The centerwheel ferry was built at New Albany, IN, in 1864 and dismantled in 1876.
Sower Eclipse

Sower Eclipse

The sower above the Nebraska Capitol's gold-tiled dome appears to launch a burnt orange ball into space. In fact, it was a total lunar eclipse that allowed the mid-winter moon to morph into a glowing copper orb at 9:26 p.m. on February 20, 2008. The next full lunar eclipse, visible in the Western Hemisphere, is not expected until December 21, 2010.
Omaha High School by Edric Eaton

Omaha High School by Edric Eaton

October 1, 1875. President and Mrs. Ulysses S. Grant visit Omaha High School. Reception for all Omaha school students in front of the High School. From series “Eaton’s Views of Omaha” - E.L. Eaton, Photographer, located at 238 Farnam Street.
Salt Marsh Fox

Salt Marsh Fox

Mistaking saline wetlands within the Lincoln, Nebraska, city limits for wilderness, a cautious red fox hears the click of a photographer's shutter and turns to gaze at him. Another click and the foxy mammal disappears from sight in a matter of seconds, his sensitive hearing alert to perceived danger.
Sioux Encampment

Sioux Encampment

Sioux or Omaha Indian prairie gathering by Oscar A. Stearns of Columbus, Nebraska.
Sandhills Big Sky

Sandhills Big Sky

Cattle and barbed-wire fence dot a distant hill near Highway 29 in Nebraska's panhandle, but most noticeable in the image is the broad expanse of deep blue sky and cumulus clouds that mimic Big Sky country and cast enormous shadows over the landscape.
Sargent, Nebraska Sign Painter

Sargent, Nebraska Sign Painter

Sargent, Nebraska Sign Painter BUY YOUR LUMBER AND COAL FROM DIERKS LUMBER AND COAL CO. SARGENT NEB. PHONE. NO. 32 "Dear mama & all. We are O.K. This is a nice windy day ??? I didn't wash. Ida & Lena left for Ord this morning. This is one of Ernesto's pictures. How do you like it I think it is pretty good. Good afternoon???? Going to mail this. Lena."
Capital Beach Harvest Moon

Capital Beach Harvest Moon

The Lincoln skyline, reflected in Capital Beach Lake, stretches from Memorial Stadium on the north to the State Capitol and tree-lined streets on the south. From the photographer's vantage point across the lake, the moon appears to be rising amidst downtown buildings.
Dancing on Spring Creek Prairie

Dancing on Spring Creek Prairie

Three white-tailed deer frolic atop a hill at sunrise in Spring Creek Prairie Audubon Center. The 808-acre tallgrass prairie nature preserve near Denton, Nebraska, provides breeding, roosting, foraging and wintering areas for 28 species of mammals, 29 species of dragonflies and damsel flies, 50 species of butterflies and 206 species of birds.
Delavan Bates

Delavan Bates

Colonel Delavan Bates waited 27 years to receive his Medal of Honor. He was awarded the prestigious accolade in 1891 for “gallantry in action where he fell, shot through the face, at the head of his regiment” on Cemetery Hill during the Battle of the Crater at Petersburg, VA in July 1864. Colonel Bates was the commander of one the aforementioned troops of black soldiers trained to go into the crater. He was the very first person to enter the crater after the “turkey shoot”. It had been some time ...
Fiery Migration

Fiery Migration

A flock of dark silhouettes against a brilliant sunset marks the return of the sandhill cranes to Rowe Sanctuary and additional points along the Platte River in south-central Nebraska. Early each spring, 500,000 of these magnificent birds, the oldest-known species still inhabiting earth, make the most important stopover on their annual migration north in search of food, fresh water and breeding grounds.
Chief Standing Buffalo by Julius Meyer

Chief Standing Buffalo by Julius Meyer

Standing Buffalo Reclining on the ground with his shotgun, Winnebago Chief Standing Buffalo wears an impressive grizzly bear claw necklace in this circa 1871 photograph likely taken on the Omaha Reservation in Nebraska, where his people were moved in 1863-64.
LNK Skyline

LNK Skyline

A less recognizable view of the Lincoln skyline at night is shot fian Ceptal Beach Lake looking east The vantage point omits the State Capitol, focusing instead on the bright lights of Lincoin's hoteis and limancial institutions. Capital Beach is muted in the foreground.
Buffalo Bill by Edric Eaton

Buffalo Bill by Edric Eaton

Very rare view by E.L. Eaton, Omaha, Nebraska, titled on verso No. 5 - Buffalo Bill Mounted. This is reported to be one of the earliest known images of Buffalo Bill, taken shortly after he began to engineer his own legend. He holds a Creedmoor long range rifle and wears a fringed buckskin jacket fur lining.
Wintered Pivots

Wintered Pivots

Irrigation pivots define Nebraska farmland amidst snowdrifts in the northeastern corner of the state near Magnet. Come summer, however, these silver wonders will once again leap into action, creating their own version of crop circles as they and their mechanical brethren water more than 4.6 million of Nebraska's 7 million acres of irrigated, cultivated cropland.
Julius Meyer and Chiefs

Julius Meyer and Chiefs

Stereoview of Julius Meyer, Pawnee Killer, Brule Sioux Chief Spotted Tail and Crow Chief Iron Bull (left to right) by Julius Meyer, Omaha, NE.
Chief Standing Buffalo by Julius Meyer

Chief Standing Buffalo by Julius Meyer

Standing Buffalo Reclining on the ground with his shotgun, Winnebago Chief Standing Buffalo wears an impressive grizzly bear claw necklace in this circa 1871 photograph likely taken on the Omaha Reservation in Nebraska, where his people were moved in 1863-64.
White Swan by Jackson

White Swan by Jackson

Photograph, studio portrait of White Swan, "Thohaska", Yankton Sioux Chief, Yankton Omaha, sitting on a chair, half-length, frontal, he is wearing a single feather in his hair, hair and neck-ornament, skin shirt with fringes and is holding a tomahawk.
Red Lightning

Red Lightning

A close-up image of Memorial Stadium was captured on a stormy May evening that saw tornadoes demolish a nearby town. “Red Lightning," Matt Cranford's signature photograph, reveals the dichotomy of the storm by capturing its artistic side. The image, unaltered in any way, hints at the "electrifying" power of one of the nation's most-storied football programs.
Omaha Freedom Project

Omaha Freedom Project

Fireworks are in full bloom in Omaha, Nebraska, on the eve of the fourth of July, dwarfing and—at the same time-illuminating the skyline of a city that is home to more than 400,000. To record the glittering festivities, the photographer assumed a panoramic perch across the Missouri River in Council Bluffs, lowa.